Baked Salmon With Gingered Rhubarb

Baked Salmon With Ginger Rhubarb

Tangy rhubarb, bright ginger, and mellow onions are the perfect accompaniment to one of my favorite kinds of fish. This excellent dish is an adaptation (with very little change) of a recipe I found at Taste of Home. The day I made it, I was using up some rhubarb I had left over from baking Rhubarb Pie. I only had enough for 2½ of the 4 cups the recipe calls for; it will be even better when I make it with the full amount. I also only had a tiny onion; medium to large is preferable. You’ll find the recipe easy to make, and it doesn’t take a lot of time, but it’s without doubt impressive enough to serve for a special occasion.

My salmon filet was in one piece, with the skin intact. I cut a bit off just to help it fit in the pan. The original recipe called for individual portions; I think it works either way. Next time, I’ll ask the fishmonger to skin the filet for me. While grilled salmon has a nice, crunchy skin, baking on a bed of vegetables tends to leave the skin a bit soggy. It’s not crucial, though; we didn’t have any trouble separating the meat from the skin after the fish was cooked.

Shopping for salmon can be a bit daunting if you’re concerned about sustainability. Overfishing is an issue in some areas. Fishing for wild salmon is prohibited along the entire east coast of the United States because of severe population declines. Other threats to salmon populations include blocked access to spawning grounds, runoff from commercial salmon farms, and climate change. Commercial salmon farms have a bit of a bad reputation for their runoff, antibiotics and toxic compounds in the fish feed (said toxins ending up in you, if you eat those fish), and other concerns. There are some farms that environmental watchdogs consider sustainable, though, because of measures they take to prevent these problems. So ask your fishmonger where their salmon comes from before deciding whether to buy. You can find more information at Seafood Watch.

Ingredients:

0 bswgr

1 medium onion

1 bunch of scallions

2 tablespoons butter

5 to 6 long stalks of fresh rhubarb (about 500 g)

¼ cup (53 g) packed brown sugar

½ cup (120 ml) white wine

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 knob fresh ginger root

1½ pounds (680 g) salmon filet, either whole or in portions

Preparation:

1.) Preheat the oven to 350º F (177º C). Mince the ginger for 2 tablespoons; set aside. Slice the scallions, reserving about 3 tablespoons to set aside. Thinly slice the onion into rings or half-rings. Heat the butter in a large oven-proof skillet or sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and the larger portion of scallions and cook, stirring frequently, for about 15 to 20 minutes, or until softened and lightly browned.

2.) While the onions cook, slice the rhubarb about ¼” to ½” (0.5 to 1 cm) thick. Once the onions are ready, stir in the rhubarb and brown sugar. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, then add the wine, ginger, salt, and pepper. I added a little hot sauce, too, but I don’t think it really made a difference. I won’t be using any next time.

3.) Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce to a steady simmer. Stirring occasionally, cook uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes or until rhubarb is softened.

3 bswgr

4.) Put the salmon, skin side down, on top of the rhubarb mixture. Transfer the pan to the preheated oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until salmon flakes easily with a fork. The internal temperature of fully cooked fish should read 135-145 º F (57-63 º C) on an instant-read thermometer.

5.) While the fish cooks, slice the scallions. Serve salmon topped with the rhubarb mixture and sprinkled with the remaining scallions.

5 bswgr

 

bswgrNutritionLabel

Baked Salmon With Gingered Rhubarb

Ingredients

1 medium onion

1 bunch of scallions

2 tablespoons butter

5 to 6 long stalks of fresh rhubarb (about 500 g)

¼ cup (53 g) packed brown sugar

½ cup (120 ml) white wine

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 knob fresh ginger root

1½ pounds (680 g) salmon filet, either whole or in portions

Directions

1.) Preheat the oven to 350º F (177º C). Mince the ginger for 2 tablespoons; set aside. Slice the scallions, reserving about 3 tablespoons to set aside. Thinly slice the onion into rings or half-rings. Heat the butter in a large oven-proof skillet or sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and the larger portion of scallions and cook, stirring frequently, for about 15 to 20 minutes, or until softened and lightly browned.

2.) While the onions cook, slice the rhubarb about ¼” to ½” (0.5 to 1 cm) thick. Once the onions are ready, stir in the rhubarb and brown sugar. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, then add the wine, ginger, salt, and pepper.

3.) Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce to a steady simmer. Stirring occasionally, cook uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes or until rhubarb is softened.

4.) Put the salmon, skin side down, on top of the rhubarb mixture. Transfer the pan to the preheated oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until salmon flakes easily with a fork. The internal temperature of fully cooked fish should read 135-145 º F (57-63 º C) on an instant-read thermometer.

5.) While the fish cooks, slice the scallions. Serve salmon topped with the rhubarb mixture and sprinkled with the remaining scallions.

 

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Oh, I’ll have to try this. Someone just sent me a rhubarb book. It’s nostalgic for me because I grew up in Wisconsin, and it grows wild there. I started talking to buddies about it, and was surprised by how many areas it’s nostalgic for.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. julie says:

      A whole book about rhubarb? Cool! What’s it called? I’ll have to read it! My great-grandfather was from Wisconsin. I wonder if that’s why rhubarb was such a favorite of my dad’s.

      Like

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