Beet Greens With Garlic & Sage

Beet Greens With Garlic and Sage

I’m not big on impulse buys, but there are exceptions to every rule. When I was at the butcher recently, they had rack of lamb that was just gorgeous. I splurged and bought one. I’m usually a pretty strict grocery list follower, but it’s not rare for me to venture off-list at the butcher if something looks particularly good. At the grocery store later, I found some beautiful red beets. Many times, grocery store beets have rather sad-looking greens or have been stripped of them altogether. Not these! They had lovely fresh greens, and I happily added a bunch to my cart. We had Herbed Rack of Lamb With Beets that night, and I carefully saved the greens for later. The next day, they still looked great.

I wasn’t a fan of beets as a kid. I guess it’s an acquired taste. The first time I ever grew my own, it was for the greens. I’d read that the young greens were delicious in salads, and they were. That summer, I kept harvesting the greens and ignoring the roots. At the end of the season, I just couldn’t bear to waste the roots. Cooking them, I was reminded just how different fresh vegetables are compared to canned, and my newfound love of all things beet was born.

Some people actually throw away the greens. I do, too, if they’re way past their prime. But when you get lucky, like I did at the market that day, it’s a crime to waste any part of such a gorgeous vegetable. Beet greens couldn’t be easier to cook. They hardly take any time, either. With a little garlic and some trimmings from my monster sage plant, it took me less than ten minutes to whip up a tasty, colorful side dish for dinner that second day.

A health note: Did you know the pigment from beets is sometimes excreted unchanged? That’s a polite way of saying that after eating beets, some people pee and/or poop red. It’s really more of a dark pink, but can certainly take you by surprise! It’s nothing to worry about, though, and will pass (sorry, bad pun!) in a day or two, as soon as you’ve, well, passed it all.

 Ingredients:

0 bggs

1 small bunch fresh sage

2 cloves garlic

2 teaspoons lemon-fused extra virgin olive oil (plain will do)

1 bunch beet greens

Preparation:

1.) Remove the stems from the sage, and mince the leaves for 2 to 3 teaspoons. Slice the garlic.

 

2.) Cut the beet stems into 1-inch (2.5 cm) lengths. Chop the greens into 1- to 1½-inch pieces. I do this by laying the leaves in a flat stack, then making several cuts horizontally and vertically through all layers.

2 bggs

 

3.) Heat the oil over medium heat; add the sage and garlic. Stirring frequently, cook until fragrant and just beginning to brown.

 

4.) Add the beet stem segments. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, then add the greens. Stirring frequently, cook just until the greens begin to wilt. Serve immediately.

bggsNutritionLabel

Beet Greens With Garlic & Sage

Ingredients

1 small bunch fresh sage

2 cloves garlic

2 teaspoons lemon-fused extra virgin olive oil (plain will do)

1 bunch beet greens

Directions

1.) Remove the stems from the sage, and mince the leaves for 2 to 3 teaspoons. Slice the garlic.

2.) Cut the beet stems into 1-inch (2.5 cm) lengths. Chop the greens into 1- to 1½-inch pieces. I do this by laying the leaves in a flat stack, then making several cuts horizontally and vertically through all layers.

3.) Heat the oil over medium heat; add the sage and garlic. Stirring frequently, cook until fragrant and just beginning to brown.

4.) Add the beet stem segments. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, then add the greens. Stirring frequently, cook just until the greens begin to wilt. Serve immediately.

 

6 Comments Add yours

  1. This is SO pretty.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. julie says:

      Thanks! It’s really tasty, too!

      Like

  2. That looks amazing. I don’t usually care for beets but I might have to give this a try, if I can ever get my hands on them fresh.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. julie says:

      Beet greens are a great way to try out beets without the beet-flavor smacking you in the face. They’re much milder than the roots. If you have anyplace you can grow some, even a windowsill, try the baby greens (2-4 inche/5-10cm leaves) raw in salads. Just throw a few in with your lettuce. Delicious!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m not blessed with a green thumb, but I might have to try when I can get the seeds.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. julie says:

        They’re one of the easiest veggies to grow. Plenty of sunshine & water now & then, nothing special.

        Liked by 1 person

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